„National Institute of Standards and Technology” változatai közötti eltérés

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A NIST több száz cégnek nyújtott kalibrálási szolgáltatást. Ezen felül, igény szerint a módszer ismertetését is végezte. Az intézet például gyakorlati útmutatót adott egy méréstannal foglalkozó tudósnak, aki ezek alapján boltban kapható anyagokból össze tudott állítani egy berendezést, amivel rendőrségi radarok pontosságának ellenőrzését lehetett elvégezni.
 
A NIST [[atomfizika]]i kutatásokkal is foglalkozott, elsősorban különféle részecskék [[lézer]]rel történő hűtésével és befogásával.
 
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:===Energia és környezet===
NIST research in atomic physics centered around the use of laser light to cool and trap various particles. The first proposal for cooling atomic ions (atoms possessing a net electrical charge) was made in 1975 by scientists including one from NIST, who, concurrently with another team, reported the first successful demonstration of this effect in 1978. By the mid-1980s, two other Institute scientists demonstrated different techniques for cooling, or slowing, atoms (which are neutral and therefore pose different challenges), a prerequisite for trapping them. All of this work was motivated initially by fundamental scientific needs and drives, but, as noted at the time, it was easy to imagine that unforeseen uses might arise. Indeed, this research led to a Nobel Prize in physics for a NIST scientist and a variety of practical applications (see Laser Cooling and Trapping Win Nobel Prize).
Meanwhile, basic research in fields such as physics and surface science enabled NIST to maintain and enhance the technical competence needed to carry out multiple missions and provide the measurement foundation for technological innovation.
 
NIST research in atomic physics centered around the use of laser light to cool and trap various particles. The first proposal for cooling atomic ions (atoms possessing a net electrical charge) was made in 1975 by scientists including one from NIST, who, concurrently with another team, reported the first successful demonstration of this effect in 1978. By the mid-1980s, two other Institute scientists demonstrated different techniques for cooling, or slowing, atoms (which are neutral and therefore pose different challenges), a prerequisite for trapping them. All of this work was motivated initially by fundamental scientific needs and drives, but, as noted at the time, it was easy to imagine that unforeseen uses might arise. Indeed, this research led to a Nobel Prize in physics for a NIST scientist and a variety of practical applications (see Laser Cooling and Trapping Win Nobel Prize).
 
Much of NIST's time during this era was taken up with research on energy and environmental problems, largely in response to the oil embargo of 1973 and a batch of environmental legislation as well as growing public support for protection of the environment. The first Earth Day was held in 1970. Several years later, it was estimated that the United States would spend more than $190 billion over the next 10 years to attain federal standards for air and water quality. NIST was a key player in the environmental movement because pollutant concentrations had to be measured accurately.