„Aszuka-kor” változatai közötti eltérés

2 899 bájt törölve ,  3 évvel ezelőtt
 
== Forrás ==
{{reflist}}
*L. Worden, Robert (1994). "Kofun and Asuka Periods, ca. A.D. 250-710". A Country Study: Japan. Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. Archived from the original on 6 April 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-06.
*L. Worden, Robert (1994). "Kamakura and Muromachi Periods, 1185–1573, Economic and Cultural Developments". A Country Study: Japan. Federal Research Division, Library of Congress. Archived from the original on 6 April 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-06. Yoshimitsu, in 1404, accepted the "King of Japan" title in his willingness to improve relations with China and to rid Japan of the wako threat, thus establishing trade with China. This was considered as tribute by the Chinese but the Japanese saw it as profitable trade. This relationship lasted for about 50 years. (see also Sinocentrism).
*general editors, John W. Hall... [; et al. (1988). The Cambridge history of Japan. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 182–183. ISBN 0-521-22352-0.
* 隋唐使の赴倭とその儀礼問題 台湾大学歴史学系 高明士 Archived September 19, 2006, at the Wayback Machine., japanology.cn
*Web Japan, sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan. "One hundred years older than supposed?: World Heritage Pagoda". Retrieved 2007-04-04.
*William Wayne Farris, Sacred Texts and Buried Treasures: Issues on the Historical Archaeology of Ancient Japan, University of Hawaii Press, 1998. Books.Google.com.
* 續日本紀 卷第一 文武紀一 Archived January 11, 2007, at the Wayback Machine., applepig.idv.tw
*『続日本紀』国史大系版, j-texts.com
*Early Samurai: 200–1500 AD by Anthony J. Bryant, Angus McBride "At about this time Paekche began feeling renewed pressure from Silla and Koguryo and pleaded with the Yamato court to send help ... During the Mimana struggles against Silla, Paekche sent many presents to Japan."(Page8)
*Sansom, George (1958). A History of Japan to 1334. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 47–49.
* Encyclopedia of World Biography on Shotoku Taishi "Two Korean high priests arrived in Japan in 595—Eji from the kingdom of Koryo (Koma) and Eso from the kingdom of Paekche (Kudara)."
*Hisao Nagayama. 「たべもの江戸史」 新人物往来社, 1976. ISBN 4309473105 p. 66. 『、「牛馬犬猿鶏の宍(肉)を食うことなかれ」の殺生禁断の令は有名拍車をかけたのが仏教の影響である。』
*Kiichi Koyanagi. 「日本人の食生活 : 飢餓と豊饒の変遷史」 Tōkyō : Shibata shoten, 1971.
*Farris, William Wayne (1998). Sacred Texts and Buried Treasures: Issues on the Historical Archaeology of Ancient Japan. University of Hawaii Press. p. 95. ISBN 978-0-8248-2030-5.
*"Complex of Koguryo Tombs". UNESCO World Heritage Centre.
*"Tori style". Britannica Concise. Encyclopædia Britannica.
*Kurashige, Taku; Rie Yamada (2003). "Asuka Period". Archived from the original on 2006-02-06.
 
==References==
97

szerkesztés